El Ukulele Goes To London

imageEl Ukulele Goes Abroad (with the broad)

Daniel will be playing at the Ukulele Festival of Great Britain this month, and making a mini-tour afterwards. I’ll be with him through June 24th and look forward to taking in a bit of the Brit Uke scene. Please, if you are in England, say “hi” to us at one of these events!

June 16th-19th
Ukulele Festival of Great Britain
http://www.ukulelefestival.co.uk/TheFestival.aspx

June 20th
Workshop and concert at Worchester Ukulele club 7:30pm
http://www.worcester-uke-club.co.uk/
https://www.facebook.com/drummondsbar

June 21st
Visit UnplugTheWood open Jam lead by Mike Krabbers
At the Lion Brewery in Ash
June 25th Workshop and Concert in Bournemouth at the
Southern Ukulele Store 2pm

June 26th Ukefest West
Fingerstyle workshop with Daniel at the Half Moon Putney –All day event with lots of activities:

Festival Date – Sunday 26th June 2016
Schedule based on start at 11:00 and end at 22:00
UFW organisers – Terry Smith, Michael Stannard, Tara Maysey, Lottie Livingstone.
With Geoff Price on the day.

Daytime events ‘Venue Room’
11:00 -12:30 Beginners workshop & Open Jam session. Run by TS, GP – Free
12:45 -13:45 Intermediate workshop. Run by TS & GP – Free
14.30 -16.00 Stage performance – West London Uke groups – Free U-Kew-Lele, Hanwell, New Malden, Teddington
16:30 –17:30 Decibelles workshop (Close Harmony singing) – £15

‘Outside area’
12:00 – 13:30 Open Mic sessions. Winners get to perform main stage at 18:00 – Free
14.30 – 15.45 Finger picking workshop – Daniel Ward – £15

Merchandise stalls in main bar.

Evening event – Main stage – £8 online adv, £10 online on day £12 cash on day
18:30 – 18.45 Stage Performance -Winners of Open Mic
18.55 – 19.15 Stage Performance – Daniel Ward
19:25 – 20.10 Stage Performance – The Half Moon Ukes
20:20 – 21.05 Stage Performance – The Decibelles
21:10 – 21:20 Joint Set / Encore –The Half Moon Ukes/ Decibelles
stage – £8 online adv, £10 online on day £12 cash on day Stage Performance – Winners of Open Mic.

The Matriarchy of Sauces

If hollandaise is the mother sauce of French cuisine, red chili sauce must be the madre of New Mexican food.  When Old World meets New World magic happens- breakfast fit for El Rey! (recipe follows)

Poached eggs in a polenta nest with red chili bearnaise. Mmmmm.

Poached eggs in a polenta nest with red chili bearnaise. Mmmmm.

I am looking forward to the cooking element of our Santa Fe adventure as much as the music!  First thing we will cook will be both red and green chili sauces.  And I’ll be putting recipes and songs and photos together into a book.  I hope you will reserve a seat at the table!

Even if you are not staying with us at the Inn, you can join in- there is a walk-in  option on the registration form, and soon we will open individual workshops to registration. (if you want to be first in line for the open registration I suggest you subscribe to the Ukulele Adventures blog post.)

And everyone is welcome at the public events, including a full-on Flamenco show at El Meson on Wednesday November 4th, and the Smoking Jackets Giant Show at Tiny’s on Friday November 6th.  Or come enjoy hearing the participants play at the Farmer’s market on Saturday morning or at La Choza Saturday night!

Full disclosure- the title of this post is the chapter heading from The Making Of A Cook by Madeleine Kamman.  That’s the book which made me a cook. Everything I know about eggs, cakes and sauces comes from the 1971 edition of this book.  I give it as a high school graduation present to every kid I know, as I think learning to cook a good omlette can save your life.  My copy is held together by tape, nostalgia and love, and I still consult it every time I make crepes.

These two pages can save your life!

The secret to life, the universe and everything

My hollandaise recipe has become somewhat free-form, but you can accomplish something like the sauce shown in the photo above if you try this:

Wisk 3 egg yolks into a cup of cold, good NM red chili sauce, add a little lemon zest and a tablespoon of lemon juice. Over a medium flame wisk constantly.  Add 3 or 4 tablespoons of COLD butter.  The butter will melt as the chili and eggs come to temperature and you will have a no-fuss emulsified sauce. Pour over poached eggs nestled onto an english muffin or polenta or spinach…to make a NM Benedict.  Or serve with fish or asparagus.

Just be sure to make enough for me, because once I hear you are making it I may show up on your doorstep- Or- join us in Santa Fe and I’ll make it for you!

Santa Fe U’ke ‘Ole-le

It’s that time of year! CHILE is roasting everywhere in New Mexico, and ex-pat New Mexicans are roasting chile anywhere they can find it. Even grocery stores in Los Angeles are selling Hatch green. We blistered up a few pounds and ate them on the spot.

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Before

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Durring

Here’s what it looks like now:

Santa Fe brewing co. is among several local craft brewers who make KILLER beer!

AFTER!     NB: Santa Fe Brewing Co. is among several local craft brewers making KILLER beer!

Southern New Mexico is known for it’s green chile, but Northern New Mexico is where the best red comes from.

Red and green chile are essentially the same plant, but red is left to ripen, and is then picked and strung into picturesque ristras to dry in the sun.  Fresh green is roasted and peeled, dried red is either powdered or pulverized into a sauce. (There just may be an article in the coming Ukulele Magazine were I go on about this, and it just may have a recipe included.)

I can’t wait for the first weekend in November, because that’s when Daniel and I go back to Santa Fe for the The New Uke Culinary Fiesta.  First order of business will be to teach everyone how to make red and green chile sauce.

There are still a few spots left for anyone who wants to sign on, and soon we will be announcing opportunities for “locals” to join the fun, including the full-on flamenco show by Miel Amarga (with Daniel on guitar) at El Meson, and a show by The Smoking Jackets at Tiny’s.

Full Smokin' Jackets! Craig McClelland, Heidi, Daniel Ward and John Bartlit.

Full Smokin’ Jackets! Craig McClelland, Heidi, Daniel Ward and John Bartlit. fab shot by http://www.allisonphoto.com/

U’KULELI!      CHILI!

If music be the food of love… I think we are in no danger of pining away!

 

It’s All About the Kids… and the Booze

aka: Academia de Ukuleles de la Ribera / Consider the Cazuela

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See, I had this idea that I would write an extended metaphor about how the new uke program started by the Club Ukulele Laguna with the La Semana de Uke-Culinary retreat folks and the mixing of a great cocktail are complicated miracles, that when all the elements are assembled with art, love and diligence the result is magic.  And then I’d reference MFK Fisher…  but really, it’s just all about the kids and the booze.

Kids first, drink recipe later. Priorities!

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First strums and smiles. That’s what the ukulele is all about.

Rounding up enough instruments for the program was step one, but throwing a bunch of instruments out into the wild won’t make it happen.  It is the fun part, though, and that was where Daniel came in.  We had the pleasure of passing out a batch of 14 Ohana ukuleles, purchased by and hand carried down to Ajijic, Mexico by the La Semana de Uke-Culinary retreat participants.

Here they come, ukes in hand!

Here they come, ukes in hand!

The hard work, organizing the program, getting the ukes together and into the country, putting together the program, finding the teacher… was done mainly by Elaine DeMann, ukulele raconteur, and Ajijic denizens Sheila Ruof and Judy King.

The wonderful Sheila- as feisty as she is dedicated!

The wonderful Sheila- as feisty as she is dedicated!

Material support has streamed in from the local ukulele club, the CUL Kids. They have provided additional instruments to the growing program; a classroom set of our forthcoming book, COLOR-ALONG Ukulele (just a few more days left to pre-order!) and have raised funds to pay a teacher.

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***Tonight, March 24, 2015 is their FUNDRAISER event!  If you happen to be in Ajijic… ***

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Everybody loves Lalo! Elaine and Sheila are no exception.

The teacher: the key element in making it all work, and boy, did they get lucky on this front!  José Eduardo García Espinoza, aka “Lalo” is a beautiful musician and human.  His kind smile and relaxed, modest manner melt any resistance. The kids love him and are inspired to impress.  Young, handsome, approachable, he is an accomplished musician and an experienced teacher who can create an atmosphere of passion and discipline. Lalo has been working with the kids every week at the community center, and the videos we have seen show just how focused they are.  They have progressed beautifully.

Lalo, who plays guitar and a host of other strings is fairly new to the uke.  Underrepresented and hard to find  in Mexico, he picked up a very basic starter soprano while in the capitol about a year ago, and fell in love.  Louis Wu at Ohana has generously offered to send Lalo a tenor-sized cut-away with a pick-up fit for a professional.

NOW, on to THE BOOZE!!!!

Kristi and Ross didn't like theirs at all!

Kristi and Ross didn’t like theirs at all!

A Cazuela, a clay bowl, is used to serve the epimonus drink.  Elaine had commemorative bowls inscribed for La Semana de Uke-Culiaria which we drained and took home.  I believe her secret recipie, passed down from her mother who was an event caterer, used pepsi.  Maybe there was some other stuff in there too. Vodka? You can’t fault me if I don’t remember…  It was a highlight of the trip.   This one looks simple to make.  Try it out- invite me over!

2 oz tequila
1 dash salt
1 sliced lime
1 sliced orange
1 sliced grapefruit
1 sliced lemon
1 tsp grenadine syrup
fill with Squirt® citrus soda

In a cazuela that is made of clay, put ice, salt, a slice of lime, orange, lemon, and grapefruit. Add grenadine, tequila, and fill with squirt. Use a straws to shake, and serve. Hilarity will ensue.

CHEERS!!!!!

CHEERS!!!!!

Our NEW BOOK!

Pre-orders are being taken now through KICKSTARTER for our NEW BOOK:

KSUke Songbookhoriz header640 x 480

The site is hot and business has been brisk! In less than 24 hours, more than 160 copies have been ordered. We are excited to have been promoted to “staff Pick” on the Kickstarter!

Color-Along Ukulele is a method book with illustrations designed to entice beginning players of all ages, and includes companion recordings– great for use in the classroom or at home.

Fun lessons and illustrations by El Rey with recordings to boot!  Woot!

Fun lessons and illustrations by El Rey with recordings to boot! Woot!

BIG THANKS to all the backers who jumped in on the first day: for believing in this project, for pledging the funds we need to finish.  Your orders will allow us to get to work on the art, recordings and deliver it to the printers.  In plenty time for the holidays. (What? Christmas already?)

And big thanks for your generosity towards others.  At least 100 of the books just bought are being directed to the hands of  kids ready to learn the ukulele in places like Haiti, India, and Mexico where we are partnered with smart organizations.  And we know a bunch of kids stateside, from California to New York who would love books in their schools and libraries.

These girls are in the ukulele program we started in Ajijic last month with the CUL Kids!

These girls are in the ukulele program we started in Ajijic last month with the CUL Kids!

Lalo, el maestro in Mexico, teaching his new class.  He was our second order!

Lalo, el maestro in Mexico, teaching his new class. He was our second order!

Please click on the site, watch the great movie edited with love and skill by Daniel’s niece Kirsten, shot by Lisa Udelson and staring her beautiful son and his friends.  Check out the rewards, which include art by El Rey, our artist.

Who wouldn't want an original by this handsome monkey-squid?

Who wouldn’t want an original by this handsome monkey-squid?

We’ll even make you dinner!

....actual platings may vary...

….actual platings may vary…

We are pleased as punch with this book and we think you will be too!  Hear the whole story on Kickstarter.  Check it out! click here:   COLOR-ALONG UKULELE

And a reminder- if you are in LA we start classes at U-Space TOMORROW! (2/28) at 10:30 am for families!  Hope to see you there!

This Is Not A Test (Kitchen)

Preparing to teach a cooking class  at the end of January at the La Semana de Uke retreat on the shores of lake Chapala  in Jalisco, Mexico means testing out some recipe ideas at home.

There are still a few spaces available to join us on this adventure which includes hiking, photography, cooking and music.  Those of you locked in a cold wintery area: I especially recommend you consider packing a small bag and jumping on the first Aeromexico flight you can book.

Here is an enticing food-a-logue to get you thinking about it.

Last week Daniel wanted to work on a flautas/taquito idea.  Poor me,  I had to suffer the consequences.

Looks tasty already!

Looks tasty already!

While gigging in Baltimore(of all places), Daniel had eaten some really tasty appetizers in a fancy Mexican joint.  Flautas con pollo were on his mind: crunchy “Mexican egg rolls”, spiced with chili, oregano, zest and juice of orange, lime and lemon… mmmm.

First, a chicken was spatchcocked and roasted,  (OK, I just love to say “spatchcocked”.  But admit it- don’t you?) shredded and mixed with the citrus, plus onion, garlic, herbs, chillies and other seasonings.

There are always some secrets kept, even in the most intimate of relationships.  Even between blogger and reader.  It is what keeps our relationship fresh.  So, yes- there may have been salt and pepper added.  Perhaps even olive oil.  But I’ll never tell.

The tiny test kitchen gets a workout!

The tiny test kitchen gets a workout!

Flour tortillas were filled and rolled with the heavenly stuffing, but instead of frying…IMG_7415he baked them in the oven.  Red Chili from Chimayo, New Mexico makes the sauce… and it is never a party without a little guacamole!

 

he baked them in the oven.  Red Chili from Chimayo, New Mexico makes the sauce… and it is never a party without a little guacamole!

Daniel gets serious about plating

Daniel gets serious about plating and garnish

and….

Mmmmmm...   Nuf said.

Mmmmmm… Nuf said.

The next day he made the same thing,  but with corn tortillas, taquito style.  Even better.  Kid tested, kid approved!

However,  I think he needs to work on this idea some more, don’t you?   My mouth is watering just thinking about it!  If you can’t stop by for dinner this week you should definitely check your schedule for the last week of January…   Learn more about joining us at http://ukuleleadventures.com/

com com com nom nom nom.

 

 

 

Ukulele Trafficking

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I want to FILL THE HOUSE!  This show is a benefit for Survivor Girl Ukulele Band, and once you read a little about what it is and what it’s all about I know you will want to support this incredible project, too!  I’ll be at the Coffee Gallery in Alta Dena at 3pm with my new band The Smoking Jackets and I really hope I’ll see you there. If you can’t make it but would like to contribute to this project, follow this link!  The text and images below are lifted from an article which appears in Hometown Pasedena.  The WHOLE ARTICLE is worth a good read!  Check it out!

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For most of us, human trafficking is a grim statistic in the news. For Laurie Kallevig, it’s up-close-and-personal. She works with survivors of human trafficking in India.

Laurie’s work is unique; she brings ukuleles to India and teaches girls (and more recently, boys) to play the instruments. She hopes, eventually, these young survivors will “write the soundtrack to the movie of their own lives.”

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Kim Ohanneson: Describe your typical day with the children. What is the age range?

Laurie Kallevig: My typical process is to start with a small size class, just six girls, and teach them for a few days, building in a lot of individualized attention and a lot of fun and success. We start with songs that they know, songs in their own language.

Soon I add another small class to the schedule and maybe even have one of the students from the first class join the second class and help to translate and teach. Next, I combine the two classes and have twelve students at about the same level. Then I add another class of beginners, and so on, building to up to two or three classes per day, each about an hour and a half in length.

Last year in Pune, I was in a rescue home that had mostly major girls, 18 years and older. Most were in the 19 to 22 year old range, but a few students were in their early 30s.

This year in Mysore (working at Odanadi Seva Trust), my students ranged from 9 years old to 19 years old. And while I didn’t have formal classes for the little ones, I tried to make time to let the little ones (5-8 years old) come in and play and strum and make believe they are rock stars.

Often the students can’t stop playing, even to pay attention to learn the next thing, and I like to think they are lost in ukuleleland—that magical place of sound and vibration and strum, strum, strumming; a place where the bad memories fade and the music and hope and dreams of a better future come to life.

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KO: Where in India have you shared music and the ukulele? Where would you like to go next? Do you hope to expand beyond India?

Laurie: Last year in 2013, I taught for about four months in a rescue home in Pune. Most of my longer-term students were repatriated to their homes in India and Bangladesh, and then unfortunately, that rescue home discontinued the survivor girl ukulele band project. (That’s a whole other story.) So then for six weeks I experimented with teaming up with an organization in Mumbai and taught at one of their drop-in centers in a small red-light area. The women I taught there were working prostitutes and pimps.

This year, 2014, I was teaching at the renowned Odanadi Seva Trust in Mysore. They have a girls home and a boys home, and I taught at both homes.

Survivor Girl Ukulele Band Project 2015 will be in Kolkata, one of the largest human trafficking hubs in the world. I’ll be working at the shelter homes of Sanlaap (sanlaapindia.org). They have over 250 girls in their four shelter homes, and I am really looking forward to it!!!

Many thousands of girls are trafficked from Nepal and Bangladesh into India, and I hope to expand SGUB Project to both of those countries some day.