Girl’s Voices from India

 

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I have written about Survivor Girl Ukulele Band several times here- These are girls in India, rescued from Human trafficking who are living in shelters and learning to play ukulele!  They have a very modest Kickstarter project right now.  Do not hesitate- SUPPORT THEM! A very small contribution will get you a copy or download. A larger donation will feel soooo goood! And- the music is LOVELY!!!! What are you waiting for? Click already!

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Ukulele Trafficking

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I want to FILL THE HOUSE!  This show is a benefit for Survivor Girl Ukulele Band, and once you read a little about what it is and what it’s all about I know you will want to support this incredible project, too!  I’ll be at the Coffee Gallery in Alta Dena at 3pm with my new band The Smoking Jackets and I really hope I’ll see you there. If you can’t make it but would like to contribute to this project, follow this link!  The text and images below are lifted from an article which appears in Hometown Pasedena.  The WHOLE ARTICLE is worth a good read!  Check it out!

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For most of us, human trafficking is a grim statistic in the news. For Laurie Kallevig, it’s up-close-and-personal. She works with survivors of human trafficking in India.

Laurie’s work is unique; she brings ukuleles to India and teaches girls (and more recently, boys) to play the instruments. She hopes, eventually, these young survivors will “write the soundtrack to the movie of their own lives.”

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Kim Ohanneson: Describe your typical day with the children. What is the age range?

Laurie Kallevig: My typical process is to start with a small size class, just six girls, and teach them for a few days, building in a lot of individualized attention and a lot of fun and success. We start with songs that they know, songs in their own language.

Soon I add another small class to the schedule and maybe even have one of the students from the first class join the second class and help to translate and teach. Next, I combine the two classes and have twelve students at about the same level. Then I add another class of beginners, and so on, building to up to two or three classes per day, each about an hour and a half in length.

Last year in Pune, I was in a rescue home that had mostly major girls, 18 years and older. Most were in the 19 to 22 year old range, but a few students were in their early 30s.

This year in Mysore (working at Odanadi Seva Trust), my students ranged from 9 years old to 19 years old. And while I didn’t have formal classes for the little ones, I tried to make time to let the little ones (5-8 years old) come in and play and strum and make believe they are rock stars.

Often the students can’t stop playing, even to pay attention to learn the next thing, and I like to think they are lost in ukuleleland—that magical place of sound and vibration and strum, strum, strumming; a place where the bad memories fade and the music and hope and dreams of a better future come to life.

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KO: Where in India have you shared music and the ukulele? Where would you like to go next? Do you hope to expand beyond India?

Laurie: Last year in 2013, I taught for about four months in a rescue home in Pune. Most of my longer-term students were repatriated to their homes in India and Bangladesh, and then unfortunately, that rescue home discontinued the survivor girl ukulele band project. (That’s a whole other story.) So then for six weeks I experimented with teaming up with an organization in Mumbai and taught at one of their drop-in centers in a small red-light area. The women I taught there were working prostitutes and pimps.

This year, 2014, I was teaching at the renowned Odanadi Seva Trust in Mysore. They have a girls home and a boys home, and I taught at both homes.

Survivor Girl Ukulele Band Project 2015 will be in Kolkata, one of the largest human trafficking hubs in the world. I’ll be working at the shelter homes of Sanlaap (sanlaapindia.org). They have over 250 girls in their four shelter homes, and I am really looking forward to it!!!

Many thousands of girls are trafficked from Nepal and Bangladesh into India, and I hope to expand SGUB Project to both of those countries some day.

 

 

Smokin’ Sunday, November 2

Daniel Ward and I will be assembling at McCabes for a Sukey Jump kid’s show with John Bartlit, Craig McClelland at 11 am.

Then we will jump in the car and squeel the tires across town to the Coffee Gallery in Pasedena for a 3 pm show as The Smoking Jackets!  Come out to one-or both- of these great shows!

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Who are the mysterious Smoking Jackets? More on that coming soon!

 

 

MCCABES GUITAR SHOP– The magical land known as McCabes has been well known for more than 50 years as the music venue for music lovers.  Every other Sunday they pull the chairs and open the doors to families with the littlest listeners and dancers.  It is about the grooviest place to groove with your toddler or preschooler.

The Coffee Gallery    is like a McCabes EAST.  Quality music, intimate setting, great vibes.  We are excited to be playing there for the first time.  This show is a benefit for Laurie Kallevig’s SURVIVOR GIRL UKULELE Band.  Laurie teaches ukulele to girls (and boys!) in India who are survivors of human trafficking.