Let’s MAKE MUSIC!

MAKE MUSIC DAY WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21st at the SKIRBALL CENTER

make-music-day-skirball-1

PARTY AT THE SKIRBALL! Make Music Day is 100% good times!

Play your ukulele! (Or learn to play!) Raise your voice! Daniel Ward and I will be leading a teach-and-strum along with Ohana ukuleles to lend at this FREE event at the Skirball.  Join us at noon, stay for Drumming with Rhythm Child, and a full day of musical programs you can interact with and enjoy.

I am hoping ukulele clubs, kids, families and ALL AGES of ukulele enthusiasts or wana-be uke players come to this event! If you are experienced, you will enjoy sharing your knowledge.  If you are new to the uke you can learn in a super-charged, loving and non- judgmental environment.  We are committed to sharing joy and connection through music, and would love to see YOU there, having fun, too.

The magnificent Alissa Hunnicutt will be on hand to make everything that much more fun, and Ohana will have a table set up where you can borrow and instrument for the day of buy one to take home to keep! ( We are so glad to have Ohana’s support on this!)

Here is some information on Make Music Day from their website:

Last year, over 750 cities around the world threw citywide music celebrations on June 21.

It all started 35 years ago in France.

In 1982, Jack Lang and his staff at the Ministry of Culture dreamed up an idea for a new kind of musical holiday. They imagined a day where free, live music would be everywhere: street corners and parks, rooftops and gardens, store fronts and mountaintops.

And, unlike a typical music festival, anyone and everyone would be invited to join and play music, or host performances. The event would take place on the summer solstice, June 21, and would be called Fête De La Musique. (In French, the name means both “festival of music” and “make music!”)

Amazingly enough, this dream has come true. The Fête has turned into a true national holiday: France shuts down on the summer solstice and musicians take over. Almost 8% of the country (5 million people) have played an instrument or sung in public for the Fête de la Musique.

Survival and Fate: Bill Graham

images

He was born a Jew in Germany under Hitler. His mother saved his life by giving him to an orphanage who sent him to France in an exchange for Christian orphans.  After France fell, he was spirited to America and grew up in the Bronx.

What happens next? He begins to make choices.

How do we become who we are? One way to understand our own fate is to examine the extraordinary lives of others.

This Saturday, September 5 at noon and 2 pm the Sukey Jump Band will be at the Skirball Center singing songs that Bill Graham knew, from Roszhinkes Mit Mandlen to the Sidewalks of New York to Oye, Como Va: Yiddish lullabies, R&B, Rock and Roll and everything in between.

Sing along, play along (we will have some Kazoos for sale so you can join the horn section) dance to groove.

Think about the life of this extraordinary person, and about your own fate- and how you are shaping it right now.